Cool Gear Alert: Lava Me Pro

As I said about their travel-size instrument in my NAMM 2020 report: “This is what an acoustic guitar from future might look like. FreeBoost Technology on the pickups uses rear surface of the guitar as a speaker, complete with reverb, delay, and chorus, all without an amp.”  Now Lava has come out with a full size version with tap tempo and a 50% solo boost.  At $800 the mini-ME seemed a bit dear for a travel sized guitar but at around $1400, the Pro seems well within, er, pro pricing. As I also said then, it is great to see something truly new in the acoustic realm. Again, we have the lovely and talented Mary Spender to demo it.

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Guitar Moderne Record Picks XXII

Catching up on a bunch of new releases. The variety and personality of modern guitarists continues to astound me, from Mary Halvorson’s angular smears to Xander Taylor’s Indian excursions. Ambitious well executed all. Stay safe and VOTE!

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Two Great New Recordings Released Today

October 16, 2020 is a banner day for modern guitar releases. Two new generation legends in the making, Mike Baggetta and Anthony Pirog  have albums dropping. Baggetta’s band mssv (with Mike Watt and Stephen Hodges) is also doing a live stream tonight under the aegis of the much-missed Big Ears Festival. Look for interviews with both artists at guitarmoderne.com soon. Subscribe so you don’t miss them.

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Cool Ableton Looper Trick

Much of what I post revolves around live performance and improvisation. Still, many guitarists are as or more concerned with creating fresh sounds and effects while recording. Here, Derek VanScoten, A/K/A Cloudchord, demonstrates a way to create a complex loop ambience that follows the chords of a song.

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Guitar Moderne Record Picks XXI

Modern electric guitar music has, at times, suffered from bouts of sameness. Employing techniques pioneered over a half century ago by Derek Bailey and Fred Frith, guitarists fanatically avoid repetitive rhythmic and/or melodic motifs and use similar preparations, to the point where they all sound virtually identical. Perhaps the form had to go through growing pains.

More recently, whether due to more schooled guitarists entering the field with wider technical skills and musical tastes, or the many new processors that allow a wealth of distinctive tones, a plethora of players, from all over the world, are creating personal voices within this idiom. The records here, solo and band, emanate from Italy, Argentina, and the US, each with its own approach to modern guitar performance.

Though live music shows are starting again, it is with limited audiences—hence limited money, so it would help these artists if you were to buy their recordings. Also, it will give you something to do all while we all wait this out.

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