Full Stian Westerhus BBC Concert

Though this video has been continuously available in segments on YouTube for years. It is now possible to watch the whole thing continuously. Thanks to Neuguitars for the heads up. Between Covid and Westerhus’ focus on singing through electronics without guitar, there has been precious little new live video. As a bonus I include some of that here.

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Video Issue Solved…Maybe.

It seems that, prior to 2015, I was able to embed YouTube videos with http in the embed code. At some point since then YouTube and or Word Press decided that unless the code was https the videos would no longer appear. I assume this has something to do with security, so fine. I just had to go back and change all the http code to htttps, and now the videos are back again.

If you have visited any of those early posts and wondered where the videos were that is what happened. Feel free to revisit them and check out the videos. If you discover any missing videos post 2015, please let me know. Unfortunately, there is nothing I can do about the videos that say “No longer available.” Those have been taken down by YouTube, the artist or the manufacturer.

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Great Site For Classic Modern Guitar Videos

I believe BibiAudiofil2 was gone from YouTube for a while but now is back. He is a Romanian music fan who has somehow amassed the most amazing collection of modern music videos I I have ever seen. For modern guitar fans, this includes vintage live footage of players like Bill Frisell, Terje Rypdal (a bonanza of videos), Marc Ribot, Pat Metheny, David Torn (with Don Cherry in 1979!), John McLaughlin, and Ralph Towner. Get over to the site while you have time and before he gets taken down.

Here is Eivind Aarset with the band that started the Guitar Moderne journey for me.

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Film Review: Bill Frisell, A Portrait

It is hard to separate my review of this movie from my relationship with Bill Frisell. I first saw him play when I went to see Percy Jones’ Stone Tiger at the Bitter End in NYC. I loved Jones’ unique bass work with Brand X and was curious to see what he was up to. The great Dougie Bowne (Lounge Lizards, Iggy Pop) was on drums. The guitarist was some guy with an early Roland GR-300 synth guitar whose playing, both on synth and standard guitar, was like nothing I had ever heard. Alternately lyrical and jagged, his Thelonious Monk-like flights of invention were like Monk only in that they were completely personal and otherworldly. Not since seeing Jimi Hendrix and Jeff Beck in the Sixties had I witnessed someone who seemed to totally reinvent the instrument in their own image.

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